LGD is developing a tandem-stack 12.9" LTPO AMOLED display for Apple's 2024 iPads

A few days ago we posted that Apple has reportedly decided to delay its iPad OLED launch to 2023, and the company canceled its current joint development project with Samsung Display, as SDC could not develop what Apple wanted - a tandem stack structure, which would have improved the lifetime and performance of the AMOLED display.

According to a new report from Korea, LG Display is also developing a tablet display for Apple - a 12.9" AMOLED panel. LG's iPad display will be ready for mass production by 2023-2024, and it will use a tandem (2 stacks) architecture on an LTPO backplane. As SDC's project is canceled, it is likely that LG's 12.9" will be the first OLED adopted by Apple's tablets.

Consumers are ready for an OLED laptop, at least according to our poll

In the last couple of years, we have seen OLED displays starting to be adopted in high-end laptop devices, and recently prices of OLED laptop panels have dropped and more mid-range laptops have opted for OLED displays (usually as an optional upgrade over an IPS LCD).

Will you next laptop featurean OLED display? (poll, 2021-08)

I recently bought a new laptop, the Lenovo Yoga Slim 7i Pro OLED, with a 14-inch 2880x1800 (2.8K) 90Hz AMOLED display. The screen, as expected from an OLED, looks brilliant. Some people are still concerned about OLED in laptops, though. Some worry that the display might suffer from burn-in.

OLED vs MicroLED - a technology comparison

MicroLED displays are exciting to many, as the technology seems to be the front runner for the next-generation display of choice in many market segments - from AR/VR glasses through wearables to TVs and IT displays.

MicroLED vs OLED vs LCD vs MicroLED tablet
The MicroLED industry though, even after billions of dollars spent on R&D, is still at a very early stage. Production costs are high, processes are not reliable enough, and there are several technical challenges to overcome before production can begin (except for some niche areas such as ultra large-size premium TVs).

IGNIS launches an automated inspection machine that fixes smartphone burn-in problems

OLED compensation technology developer IGNIS Innovation launched an interesting new system that can be used to inspect and fix burn-in problems in Android smartphones.

The system, which IGNIS calls an Automated Optical Inspection System (AOIS) is a tabletop machine that you insert an Android smartphone into, and it identifies areas with image retention. Using software drivers, one can then compensate for these problems. The compensation is based on IGNIS proprietary MaxLife compensation technology.

Apple aims to adopt tandem OLEDs in its next iPad Pro tablets

In a very interesting post, The Elec states that Apple has reached out to both Samsung Display and LG Display, requesting that the display suppliers develop a longer-lifetime OLED display for Apple's next iPad Pro devices.

Mercedes Benz 12.8'' OLED screen in the 2021 S-Class

LG 12.8-inch P-OLED in Mercedes Benz 2021 S-Class

The lifetime of the current crop of mobile OLED devices is not enough for Apple's iPad - which is designed to be used for a longer period of time compared to a smartphone. An increased lifetime will also result in lower burn-in problems which seem to trouble Apple.

Samsung Electronics may not adopt QD-OLEDs for its TVs, SDC looking for other customers

In October 2019 Samsung Display formally announced its decision to invest $10.85 billion in QD-OLED TV R&D and production lines. The company is already starting to produce prototypes, and is on track to start mass production in Q3 2021.

But SDC is facing a problem it probably did not anticipate - Samsung Electronics is hesitant about the adoption of QD-OLED panels, and may not ship QD-OLEDs in 2021 - or maybe even at all. Apparently Samsung Electronics wants to focus on microLEDs for next-generation displays as it finds QD-OLED TVs to be not bright enough - and also because it suffers from burn-in issues.

Philips develops new software to solve burn-in issues in OLED TVs

Philips recently announced its latest OLED TVs, the OLED 805, and the company is apparently worried about burn-in issues, and it is developing software technology to mitigate such issues - specifically the problem with network logos.

Philips OLED805 photo

Pocket-lint reports that it has seen Philips' new technology being demonstrated. Philips' algorithm recognizes these logos, and reduces the brightness of the pixels that display the logo. This extends the lifetime of these pixels and should keep them at the same level as other pixels that do not display constant logos.

HiSense to add new technologies to solve burn-in, low brightness and color accuracy issues in its 2020 OLED TVs

In November 2018 HiSense launched its first OLED TV range, the Series X in Australia and later in Europe. The 55" model is now shipping in the UK for £1,149. According to reports, demand for HiSense's OLEDs were lower-than-expected, at least in Australia.

HiSense 55PX OLED TV photo

According to a new report from China, HiSense 2020 OLED TVs will feature new technologies to solve image burn-in, low brightness and color inaccuracies. HiSense developed six-layers of technologies that include LEA-edge station logo monitoring and adjustment; local brightness adjustment of static content under dynamic video; brightness adjustment function for still images; overscan pixel shift technology; OFFRS function; and JB function.

Samsung releases a video to help you find burn-in marks in your OLED TV, suggests a switch to QLED

Samsung released a short video that may help you find burn-in marks in your OLED TV. The video should be run on your OLED TV, and it shows a red image that will (according to Samsung) show visible marks if there are any issues in your TV.

If you did find such marks - Samsung suggested to contact a service center - or switch to one of its QLED LCDs... I wonder if this is a mart marketing move as Samsung itself is now committed to OLED TV technology and will start producing QD-OLEDs in 2021. Samsung is probably hoping that no one will remember this video by then...

LG ordered to compensate two Australian consumers due to OLED TV burn-in

A Federal Court in Australia ordered LG Electronics to pay a fine of $160,000 AUD to two consumers after LG refused to repair, replace or refund OLED TVs that exhibited burn in after less than a year of use.

LG OLED C9 photo

Under the Australian law, consumers who purchased faulty products are entitled to a repair, refund or replacement - even if the warranty does not apply or has come to an end. The two OLED TVs were bought in 2013.

Cambridge Isotope Laboratories - Deutreated Reagents and High-Purity Gases for OLEDsCambridge Isotope Laboratories - Deutreated Reagents and High-Purity Gases for OLEDs