Cynora logoCynora, established in 2003 in Germany, is developing new materials for OLEDs and OPVs, and is also involved with component design and production processes. In October 2012 the company unveiled flexible solution-based OLED prototypes that use the company's own emitter materials.

In July 2013 Germany’s BMBF launched the cyCESH project which aims to develop soluble (printable) materials for low-cost high efficiency OLED lighting devices, Cynora is the leader of the consortium in this €6 million project, together with Novaled and the University of Regensburg.

On April 2017 we posted an interview with Cynora's CMO who discusses the company's latest materials and future plans.

Company Address: 
Werner-von-Siemens-Strasse 2-6 Building 5110
76646 Bruchsal
Germany

The latest Cynora OLED news:

A Q&A with Cynora's CEO, to discuss the company's new blue emitter

OLED material developer Cynora recently announced its first commercial product, the cyBlueBooster fluorescent blue emitter that is 15% more efficient that current fluorescent blue emitters on the market.



Cynora cyBlueBooster OLED closeup photo

This was a very interesting announcement, and Cynora's CEO Adam Kablanian was kind enough to answer a few questions we had to help understand the new material and Cynora's current business and latest technology.

Cynora announces a new blue fluorescent emitter that is 15% more efficient than current emitters

OLED material developer Cynora announced its first commercial product, a fluorescent blue emitter that is based on an "advanced molecular design" that is 15% more efficient that current fluorescent blue emitters on the market. Cynora brands its new material as cyBlueBooster, and it says it is currently available for commercialization in several shades of blue.

Cynora cyBlueBooster OLED devices photo

This could be very exciting news - while the whole industry is looking for next-generation emitters using TADF or PHOLED technologies, Cynora could have found an easier path to reduce power consumption by 15%. OF course a TADF or PHOLED emitter will achieve a reduction of 75% in power consumption compared to currently-used fluorescent emitters.

TADF OLED emitter technology - industry status

TADF, or Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence, is a relatively new class of OLED emitter materials that promise efficient and long-lifetime performance without any heavy metals. TADF research started at around 2012, originally at Kyushu University in Japan and today many academic groups and several commercial companies are developing TADF materials.

Blue TADF emitter molecules

The main reason companies are interested in TADF emission is that it could lead to an efficient and long-lasting blue OLED emitter - something that hasn't been yet achieved by other means (mainly - UDC's Phosphorescent OLED emitter technology). In recent years companies initiated commercial development of red, green and yellow TADF emitters as these can offer a lower cost alternative to UDC's PHOLEDs materials.

Cynora raised $25 million in its Series C funding round

TADF developer CYNORA announced that it has secured $25 million in its Series C funding round from investors in Asia, Europe and the US. Since 2008, Cynora raised $80 million.

Cynora TADF OLED blue emitter in the lab (photo)

Cynora's latest deep-blue material specification was presented in May 2018 - with a CIEy of 0.14, EQE of 20% and a lifetime of 20 hours LT97 at 700 nits. Cynora expects to have blue material in mass production by 2020. In October 2018 Cynora extended its joint-development agreement with LG Display.

Things we learned at the first day of OLED Korea 2019

The first day of the OLED Korea 2019 conference is almost over - with some interesting lectures and talks by leading OLED companies and professionals. Here are some of the things under discussion today (highlights only):

LGD's future plans for OLED TVs at OLED Korea 2019 photo

  • Some believe there will be a real market for >$2,000 foldable OLED devices, and some call for cost reductions before real adoption could take place
  • LG Display is optimistic regarding the future of OLED TVs
  • Samsung will not commit yet to its QD-OLED technology
  • Both Cynora and Kyulux are rapidly progressing towards a long lasting TADF/HF blue - but it seems there's still work to be done
  • Idemitsu Kosan is increasing its fluorescent OLED emitter efficiency
  • Universal Display's RGBB architecture is back on the table - and the company now highlights the architecture's low blue light emission. UDC seems more optimistic then ever regarding blue PHOLED commercialization
  • Equipment maker's focus is shifting to China as Korean OLED makers will not increase capacity in the near future

Cynora extends its cooperation with LGD for deep-blue TADF emitters, samples green TADF emitters

TADF developer CYNORA has announced that it has extended its joint-development agreement with LG Display. The two companies have been co-developing deep-blue TADF OLED emitters for two years, and have now decided to continue the cooperation towards the commercialization of TADF emitters in OLED displays.

Cynora TADF OLED blue emitter in the lab (photo)

CYNORA's latest deep-blue material specification was presented in May 2018 - with a CIEy of 0.14, EQE of 20% and a lifetime of 20 hours LT97 at 700 nits. Cynora expects to have blue material in mass production by 2020. Cynora says that its TADF materials are suitable for both self-emitting or co-emitting approaches (which includes hyper-fluorescence).

Cynora to present its latest blue TADF emitter at the OLEDs World Summit conference

TADF developer CYNORA announced that it will present its latest deep-blue TADF emitter material at the OLEDs World Summit which starts today in San Francisco.

Cynora TADF material in lab (photo)

CYNORA's latest material specification was presented in May 2018 - with a CIEy of 0.14, EQE of 20% and a lifetime of 20 hours LT97 at 700 nits. Cynora expects to have blue material in mass production by 2020, and when its deep-blue material is ready it will start to develop the less challenging highly efficient green and red materials. Last month we interviewed Cynora's CMO Dr. Andreas Haldi - who talked about TADF, lifetime, color points and more.

An interview with Cynora's CMO Dr. Andreas Haldi - talking about TADF, lifetime, color points and more

German TADF developer Cynora presented its latest blue TADF material in May 2018 - with a CIEy of 0.14, EQE of 20% and a lifetime of 20 hours LT97 at 700 nits. Cynora expects to have blue material in the mass production by 2020.

Dr. Andreas Haldi - Chief Marketing Officer Cynora

Cynora's Chief Marketing Offer, Dr. Andreas Haldi was kind enough to answer a few questions we had regarding TADF emitters, the differences between next-generation emitter technologies, lifetime, color points and more.

CYNORA presents high-performance blue TADF emitters at the SID Display Week 2018

The following is a sponsored post by Cynora

CYNORA, a leader in TADF (thermally activated delayed fluorescence) materials for OLEDs, presents its newest high-performing blue emitting materials at the SID Display Week 2018 in Los Angeles. The company is currently working with the key display makers to finish the commercialization of the industry’s first blue high-efficiency emitter.

Cynora Blue TADF OLED material photo

OLED displays have become standard for premium mobile and TV displays in the last couple of years. However, those OLED displays have not yet reached their fullest potential. High-efficiency blue OLED emitters are needed to reduce power consumption and increase the display resolution further. Despite urgent requests by the OLED display panel makers for a high-efficiency blue emitter in the last few years, no material supplier has yet been able to produce such an emitter.

Cynora presents a new blue TADF emitter, aims to meet LGD's and SDC's specification soon

German TADF developer Cynora recently participated in the international OLED summit in China, and the company presented its latest blue TADF material that features a CIEy of 0.18, EQE of 21% and a lifetime of 10 hours LT97 at 700 nits. This is an improvement of the material shown in September 2017 (which had the same specification but with a lower EQE of 14%).

Cynora: where are we today slide (Feb 2018)

Cynora reports that during the last 24 months, the company achieved its most important goals - high efficiency and a satisfying color point. It has made "tremendous progress" in the last year on the lifetime front and is now close to commercial lifetime specification.

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Kyulux - Hyperfluoresence OLED emittersKyulux - Hyperfluoresence OLED emitters