The DoE grants $1 million to OLEDWorks for flexible OLED lighting R&D

The United States Department of Energy (DoE) granted $1.05 million for OLEDWorks, allocated through the DoE's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The funds will be used to further improve efficiency and lower the costs of flexible OLED lighting panels, which will help reduce energy consumption while simultaneously providing healthier, unique lighting solutions that are cost competitive in the main stream lighting markets.

OLEDWorks Lumicurve Wave photo

In November 2018 OLEDWorks announced that its first flexible OLED lighting panels are now commercially available. The OLEDWorks LumiCurve Wave are produced on Corning's 0.1mm thin Willow Glass flexible glass substrates. OLEDWorks says that the Wave panels are extremely thin and light and deliver the superb light quality and excellent color rendering that is uniquely achievable with OLED.

Researchers use reactive ion etching to create nanostructures that boost the efficiency of white OLED devices

Researchers from TU Dresden developed a new method to extract trapped photos from OLED devices. The idea is to generate controllable nanostructures with directional randomness and dimensional order. This method is said to significantly boost the efficiency of white OLED devices. The researchers report that it is possible to achieve an external quantum efficiency of up to 76.3%.

Reactive ion etching for the generation of quasi-periodic nanostructures (TU Dresden)

To produce the nanostructures, the researchers use reactive ion etching, a facile, scalable and lithography-free method. In addition to these advantages, the method enables to specifically control the topography of the nanostructures by adjusting the process parameters.

Researchers develop a single-layer, efficient TADF OLED device

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) have developed an efficient OLED device that is comprised of a single organic material layer - replacing the normal stack of 5-7 layers in modern OLED devices.

Single-layer TADF OLED device (MPI)

The researchers managed to create this OLED device by using a TADF material (CzDBA, diboron based TADF) and by using a newly developed charge injection strategy. The OLED device features a low operating voltage (2.9V at 10,000 cd/m2, an EQE of 19% (at 500 cd/m2) and a lifetime of 1,880 hours at 50% (for 1,000 cd/m2). The color of the device is greenish-yellow.

The DoE grants $1.1 million to Penn State researchers and OLEDWorks to research low refractive index organic materials

The US Department of Energy (DoE) has granted $1.1 million to Penn State University professors Chris Giebink and Michael Hickner for a new project to increase the efficiency of OLED lighting panels.

The researchers, collaborating with OLEDWorks in this project (and previous ones as well), aim to find a way to lower the refractive index of the organic materials which will increase the external efficiency of OLED devices. The basic idea is to insert other molecules and blend them with the existing OLED materials which lower the refractive index without adversely affecting the properties of the original molecules.

UDC: our RGB1B2 AMOLED architecture minimizes blue light hazard

In 2010 Universal Display announced a new AMOLED display architecture called RGB1B2 that uses two blue sub-pixels - a fluorescent deep-blue and a phosphorescent light blue. The introduction of a light blue sub-pixel can significantly extend the operational lifetime of an OLED display and reduce the display's power consumption by as much as 33%.

UDC RGB1B2 AMOLED architecture, blue light (OLED Korea 2019)

The RGB1B2 was never adopted (one of the reasons is that adding another sub pixel complicates the TFT backplane and has other disadvantages - but the architecture is now again on the table and UDC presented it again at OLED Korea 2019.

Kyulux's CEO shares company updates at OLED Korea 2019

In June 2018 Kyulux and Wisechip unveiled a PMOLED display that uses Kyulux’s Hyperfluorescence yellow emitter. Kyulux updated today that Wisechip is now ready to start producing the HF panel and is seeking customers.

Wisechip eventually settled on a large panel - 73.00 x 41.86 mm (2.7") with a resolution of 128x64. Wisechip says that the power consumption of its HF display is almost half of its regular fluorescent yellow PMOLED.

Double-doping of OLED materials could double the efficiency of polymer OLED displays

Researchers from Sweden's Chalmers University have developed a new "double doping" process that basically doubles the efficiency of Polymer OLED emitter materials.

The researchers explain that doping in organic semiconductors operates through what is known as a redox reaction, in which the dopant molecule receives an electron from the semiconductor which increases the electrical conductivity of the semiconductor. The efficiency limit of current doped organic semiconductors has been limited by the fact that each dopant molecule was able to to exchange one electron only. In the new research it was shown how it is possible to move two electrons for every dopant molecule which increases the conductivity of the organic material.

Lyteus partners demonstrate the world's longest flexible OLED lighting device at 15 meters

The Fraunhofer FEP institute, the Holst Center and other partners have developed a 15-meter long OLED lighting panel, the longer OLED device ever (beating their own 2017 record of a 10-meter OLED). This work was done as part of the Lyteus, the EU's €14 million initiative within PI-SCALE.

Lyteus 15 meter OLED lighting roll
The partners in this project say that this is the first OLED produced using a new unique roll-to-roll (R2R) process that combines the performance of an evaporated OLED stack with solution processing of auxiliary layers.

Google details OLED power consumption, shows how Android's dark mode can help extend your battery life

As OLED is an emissive display technology, an OLED pixel only draws power when it is used - and the brighter it is, the more power it consumers. This of course means that adopting a dark UI is better for your device's power life.

Power consumption on the Google Pixel (2016) per color

During Google's recent Android Dev Summit, the company detailed the power consumption of the OLED display used in its 2016 Pixel smartphone (an SDC FHD 5" AMOLED). As you can see in the image above, the power consumption is different for each color (with red being the most efficient color and blue the least efficient). Surprisingly the display draws quite a bit of power even when completely black.

The Washington Post mistakenly blame OLEDs for low battery life in 2018 smartphones

The Washington Post's Geoffrey A. Fowler posted an interesting article in which he details how new smartphones are under-performing older ones in terms of battery life. Geoffrey puts 12 smartphones to the same test, and checks which ones dies first.

Washington Post 2018 OLED vs LCD smartphone power test

It is interesting that the new 2018 smartphones under performs similar smartphones released in 2017. Geoffrey's conclusion is that new display technology - high resolution OLEDs, are the culprit. The main reasoning behind that is that the iPhone XR (with its LCD display) performs better than the iPhone XS, even though the XR has a smaller display.

Cambridge Isotope Laboratories - Deutreated Reagents and High-Purity Gases for OLEDsCambridge Isotope Laboratories - Deutreated Reagents and High-Purity Gases for OLEDs