Cynora achieves breakthrough in its green TADF material, test kits are now available for display makers

OLED material developer Cynora announced that it achieved a breakthrough in its deep-green TADF material, which it brands as cyUltimateGreen. The new material delivers an efficiency of over 20% (EQE), a lifetime of 400 hours (LT95@15mA) and a color point and emission spectrum that matches today's DICI-P3 standard (Cynora does not specify the exact number).

Cynora cyUltimateGreen TADF testing kit photo

Cynora further announced that is now making test kits of the new deep-green emitter available to its customers. Display makers can now start testing and verification using the new material. Cynora says it will also 'soon' follow with a deep-blue TADF solution.

LGD announces a higher efficiency WOLED stack, to start producing 42-inch and 83-inch panels

LG Display announced that it has developed and employed new OLED technologies, including new OLED materials and a new OLED device structure (with a new added layer) that enabled it to improve the efficiency of its large-area WOLED panels by around 20%. This enabled LGD to increase the brightness of its OLEDs.

LG GX OLED TV photo

The first display to adopt this new structure and materials is the company's 77-inch OLED panel, but LGD will also apply it to its other panels over 2021. LGD also announced that it will start producing 83-inch and 42-inch OLED TV panels, that will join its existing 48-, 55-, 65-, 77- and 88-inch models.

Researchers develop highly efficient polarized light emitting polymer OLED devices

Researchers from the Imperial College London have devised a method to create strong chiral light emitting polymers OLEDs. These OLED devices emit efficient polarized light - which means that they could be used to create OLEDs without an anti-reflection polarizer filter and thus enable higher efficiency displays.

Chiral optical response in OLED devices (ICL)

The researchers discovered that using thin films of aligned polymer LED devices shaped like fusili pasta it is possible to emit high chirality light.

Samsung and Stanford researchers develop a novel Metaphotonic OLED structure that enables high performance OLED displays

Researchers from Stanford university in collaboration with Samsung's Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT) developed a new OLED structure that enables resolution of up to 10,000 PPI, high brightness and a cost-effective production process.

Metaphotonic OLED structure

In the new so-called Metaphotonic OLED structure, the panel is produced on a base layer of reflective metal with nanoscale corrugations. This 'metasurface' can manipulate the reflective properties of light and thereby allow different colors to resonate in the OLED sub-pixels.

A discussion on MicroLED efficiency

MicroLED technology is regarded by many as a highly promising display technology, that could rival OLED in many applications in the future. We have been following microLEDs since 2018 via MicroLED-Info and are indeed excited by the progress and potential of this display technology.

MicroLED device efficiency by chip size (University of Central Florida, AUO)

Peak EQE of RGB micro-LED as a function of LED chip size (source: Crystals)

One of the most talked-about advantages of microLED displays compared to OLEDs is the power efficiency. MicroLEDs are based on in-organic LEDs, which are inherently much more efficient than organic LEDs.

UDC researchers developed a stable plasmonic-enhanced OLED device

Researchers at Universal Display, developed an OLED device with plasmonic decay rate enhancement that dramatically increase device stability. By including a nanoparticle-based out-coupling scheme to extract energy from the plasmon mode, the researchers managed to maintain the device efficiency.

Stable plasmonic OLED structure and image, UDC

The device used an archetypal phosphorescent emitter to achieve a two-fold increase in functional stability at the same brightness as a reference conventional OLED device and extracted 16% of the energy from the plasmon mode as light.

Samsung announces a new variable refresh rate technology for its latest AMOLED displays

Samsung Display announced a new OLED technology, called Adaptive Frequency that enables variable refresh rate in AMOLED displays - ranging from 10Hz to 120Hz. Running OLEDs at low refresh rates when possible can reduce the power consumption of the display (over all applications) by up to 22%.

Samsung Variable Refresh Rate OLED Technology testing

This new display technology was applied for the first time in the Galaxy Note20 Ultra 5G smartphone, announced earlier this month, with its 6.9-inch 1440x3088 Dynamic AMOLED.

Kopin developed a 7,000 nits color OLED microdisplay

Kopin Corporation announced in January 2020 that the company developed a new double-stack OLED architecture that enables brighter microdisplays with longer lifetime. Earlier this yeare Kopin announced a new 1.3" 2560x2560 OLED microdisplay, developed with Panasonic and Lakeside Optoelectronic, that uses the new double-stack architecture and achieves brightness of over 1,000 nits.

Kopin Lightning OLED microdisplay photo

Kopin 1" 2k x 2k OLED Lightning microdisplay

Kopin now announced that its latest 720p OLED Lightning dual-stack OLED display has exhibited very high brightness of 7000 nits with good color and high contrast. Kyulux explained that to achieve this high brightness, it has worked with its partner, Lakeside Optoelectronics to optimize the duo-stack OLED structure to output color spectrum to match the bandpass of the color filters for high color fidelity, coupled with very high current efficiency and low operating voltage.

Kyulux updates on its latest Hyperfluorescence TADF emitter performance

Kyulux presented a new paper at SID Displayweek, that shows the latest progress of the company's Hyperfluorescence OLED emitter platform. You can see the latest performance chart below.

Kyulux TADF HF material specifications, August 2020

Hyperfluorescence combines TADF and fluorescence emitters, which enables high-efficiency (~100% IQE) emitters that feature long lifetimes and a very narrow emission spectrum. The company's yellow HF emitter is already commercialized, and now Kyulux says that its red and green materials are "close to commercialization". The company is also improving the color point and lifetime of its HF blue emitters.