A new transparent electrode design improves OLED light output by up to 20%

Researchers from the University of Michigan developed a new electrode design for OLED devices, that can increase light output by up to 20% compared to current electrodes. The new electrode is compatible with current production processes.

OLED device with waveguide-elimination structure (University of Michigan)

The new design helps to minimize the waveguiding effect, which traps around 80% of the light produced by the OLED emitters. The researchers used a modal elimination approach, which involves optimizing the organic stack and the replacing the ITO anode with a thin film of silver deposited on a layer of copper. This kind of approach can be applied to other light emitting structures such as inorganic LEDs, perovskite LEDs, quantum dots and more.

OTI Lumionics' CEO updates on the company's technologies and plans

Canada-based OTI Lumionics developed innovative OLED materials and technologies. In August 2020 the company announced that it will start shipping its 2nd-gen ConducTorr Cathode Patterning Materials (CPM) by the end of 2020 to customers, which will use these to create OLED displays with under-the-display camera and face unlock technologies.

OTI Lumionics laboratory photo

We had a short talk with the company's founder and CEO, Dr. Michael G. Helander, during which we discussed the company's technology, status and future plans.

Kyulux reveals its latest TADF material performance

During SID Display Week 2021, Kyulux detailed its latest TADF material performance. The red and green materials are "close to commercialization", and the company reports "excellent progress" with its blue emitter.

Using simulations, Kyulux shows how its Hyperfluorescence system is more efficient than a comparable phosphorescence emitter. While both emitters feature pretty much the same EQE, the narrow spectrum of the HF system which results in higher light intensity and can enable more efficient displays - by around 10%, according to Kyulux.

Tianma shows a microLens AMOLED panel with improved power consumption

Tianma demonstrated a new AMOLED display panel at SID Displayweek, that sports a micro-lens array that helps to decrease power consumption by 10-15%.

Tianma 6.2'' microLens (MLP) AMOLED (SID Displayweek 2021)

The so-called MLP panel is 6.2" in size with a 876x2142 resolution (373 PPI) and a brightness of 420 nits. The pixel configuration is, interestingly, YYG - yellow and green sub-pixels, which means that this display uses color filters.

BOE shows new OLED technologies at SID Displayweek 2021

BOE demonstrates several new OLED technologies at SID Displayweek 2021. First up is a new rollable display. The new display is 8-inch in size, and it features a resolution of 2592x2176 and a bending radius of 4 mm. BOE says the new display passed over 200,000 sliding cycles.

Last year at Displayweek 2020, BOE demonstrated a 12-inch rollable OLED. It has since been working with LG Electronics on the company's rollable smartphone (which was since canceled as LG withdrew from the smartphone market) and with OPPO on a 7.4-inch sliding OLED phone.

Here is Tianma's CFOT rollable AMOLED display

In March 2021 Tianma unveiled a new OLED display technology, which it refers to as CFOT OLED - a polarizer-free OLED that adopts color-filters instead to remove reflections. The company demonstrated a 8.03" CFOT OLED prototype at SID Displayweek 2021:

Tianma says that a CFOT OLED enables a thinner design, improves the light emittance and also cuts the power consumption by 20%. The 8.03" display offers a resolution of 2000x2544 (403 PPI).

Here come Samsung polarizer-free POL-LESS OLEDs

Samsung Display has been developing polarizer-free AMOLED displays for many years, and last year UBI detailed how the company plans to use color filters to eliminate the need for polarizers and so increase the efficiency of their OLED panels while also lowering the thickness.

Samsung Display POL-LESS AMOLED structure image

DSCC posted an interested article that details Samsung's upcoming polarizer-free OLEDs, which it brands as POL-LESS OLEDs. The first OLEDs to adopt this new structure are expected to be adopted in Samsung's Galaxy Fold 3 later this year.

Samsung Display to focus on lowering the power consumption of its smartphone AMOLED displays

Samsung Display has recently announced two design wins for its smartphone LTPO AMOLED displays - the Oppo Find X3 series and the OnePlus 9 Pro. Both adopt the same 6.7-inch 1440x3216 120Hz HDR10+ (1,300 nits peak) LTPO AMOLED display.

Oppo Find X3 Pro photo

Samsung also announced that in the past the company's priority was to improve the image quality and the design of its OLED displays. Moving forward, SDC will focus on lowering the power consumption of its OLED displays. SDC will do so by developing low-power materials and "optimizing power-efficient technologies".

New OLED device structure, called OPB-LET, offers promising performance

Researchers from Dresden's Technical University (TUD) developed a new OLED device structure that combine vertical organic permeable base transistors (OPBT) and OLEDs materials - organic permeable base light-emitting transistor, or OPB-LET.

The device architecture of organic permeable base light-emitting transistors (OPB-LET)

The new design successfully combines the function of a highly efficient switching transistor and an organic light-emitting diode. The OLED transistors (OLETs) are three-terminal devices combining a thin-film transistor with a light-emitting diode. Unlike previous OLETs, the OPB-LET offer high performance, thanks to the permeable base electrode located at the center of the device. The electrode forms a distinctive optical microcavity and so regulates the charge carrier injection and transport.

Just how much more efficient is Samsung's latest M11 OLED stack?

Last month Samsung Display announced that it has designed a new OLED stack (its M11 stack) that is 16% more efficient compared to its currently OLED stack. The first phone to adopt the new OLED materials will be the Galaxy S21 Ultra.

GS21 Ultra, GS20 Ultra and Note 20 power consumption comparison (AnandTech)

Anandtech posted an interesting and what seems to be comprehensive review of the Galaxy S21 Ultra display, comparing it to Samsung's previous generation panels. As you can see in the chart above, the results show that the new OLED stack is actually 26% to 31% more efficient when showing a full white screen. The brighter the display, the more efficient the new stack is compared to SDC's previous M10 OLED stack.

Cambridge Isotope Laboratories - Deutreated Reagents and High-Purity Gases for OLEDsCambridge Isotope Laboratories - Deutreated Reagents and High-Purity Gases for OLEDs