ETNews: Samsung is developing hybrid QD-OLED TVs

ETNews posted an interesting article, claiming that Samsung Display is developing a new TV technology that combines OLED emitters with quantum-dot photo-luminescence materials. The basic idea is to use blue OLED emitters and then convert the blue light to white light using quantum-dots combined with color filters (QDCFs) to add red and green colors.

Samsung OLED TVs (2013)

This seems to be a rather complicated design, but it could be much easier to produce compared to a true RGB OLED TV, as there is no need for precise OLED patterning. This is similar to LG's WRGB OLED TVs which use a white OLED source (made from yellow and blue emitters) and color filters on top.

The EU SOLEDLIGHT project developed solution-processed R2R OLEDs, reports interim results

The SOLEDLIGHT (Solution Processed OLEDs for Lighting) project was launched in 2015 by a European consortium with an aim to develop cost efficient, roll-to roll (R2R) solution processed OLEDs, including their integration in prototype multiple-panel OLED lighting systems and luminaires.

The SOLEDLIGHT consortium (which is coordinated by the University of Valencia and includes OSRAM and Solvay) reported that it managed to develop multi-layer R2R solution processed OLEDs that achieved a power efficiency of 20 lm/W. This is still not up to par with evaporation-based OLEDs, but the project partners aim to achieve 100 lm/W (and 15,000 hours) by the end of 2017.

IKEA launches its first OLED lamp, the Vitsand chandelier

IKEA launched its first OLED lamp, the Vitsand - a chandelier with 7 OLED panels. The Vitsand provides 700 lumens at 2700K. Each panel is about 77 lm/W (total 7W). The lamp is dimmable, and the panels unfortunately cannot be replaced.

IKEA Vitsand OLED photo

The Vitsand is now available in IKEA Europe for €199. It is great to see OLED lighting enter a retail store like IKEA, even though the price is still very high. The panels are likely made by LG Display but we are not sure.

DSCC: LGD will start mass producing top-emission OLED TV panels in 2019

LGD's current OLED TV panels use a bottom-emission architecture, but according to DSCC LGD is aiming to shift their production process to a top-emission design starting in 2019. LG currently has a pilot capacity of about 3,000 monthly top-emission substrates, and plans to start mass production (with over 10,000 monthly substrates) in 2019.

Toshiba X97 photo

DSCC says that top-emission will be required for 65" 8K panels as a bottom-emission design will not be bright enough with such a high density. The shift to top-emission will increase the aperture ratio (=brightness) by around 10%.

Updates from the TADF symposium: Cynora's latest blue, SDC and LGD hopeful on TADF

A few days ago, Cynora hosted the 2017 International TADF Symposium in Frankfurt, Germany. Cynora reports that about 150 attendees from all over the world listened to experts from the industry and academia and were updated on the latest news regarding TADF OLED emitters.

TADF Symposium photo 2017

Cynora itself showed an update on its latest blue emitter. The company now has material that features a CIEy of 0.18 (target - 0.1), EQE of 14% (target 15%) and a lifetime of 10 hours LT97 at 700 nits (target is over 100 hours). Cynora says that development is progressing well and it is confident it will reach its target material performance by the end of the year.

How will the phosphorescent emitter market look in 2018, following UDC's basic material patent expiration?

The phosphorescent OLED emitter market is currently dominated by Universal Display who owns the basic patents to phosphorescent OLED emitters. All the major OLED makers (including Samsung and LGD) are using UDC's materials in order to achieve higher display efficiencies, beyond what is available from fluorescent emitters.

Universal Display holds over 4,000 issued and pending patents, but some of its basic phosphorescent patents are set to expire by the end of 2017. Honestly, it is very difficult to know exactly what effect this will have on the market - some analysts believe that it will carry very little effect while others say that this will open the door for other companies to sell competing phosphorescent emitters.

Researchers from Kyushu University design a new family of TADF emitters based on ESIPT

Researchers from Kyushu University's Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA) developed a new TADF emitter molecule that is based on excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT).

TADF-ESIPT excitation scheme (Kyushu 2017)

The researchers says that ESIPT can be used to design completely new TADF materials, which could enable researchers to achieve a high performance and long-lasting emitter structure, as a new material family may expand the molecule design possibilities. TADF from a ESIPT molecule has been reported previously - but the researchers say that this is the first demonstration of highly efficient TADF observed inside and outside of a device.

BOE's new OLED, LCD and QD displays from SID 2017 shown in video

Last month BOE demonstrated several exciting new display technologies at the SID DisplayWeek, and now we have this very nice (and long) video that shows most of BOE's new displays.

We start with a tablet-phone device, a 7.56" foldable touch-enabled OLED that features an QXGA (2048x1536) resolution, a bending radius of 5 mm and a contrast rate of over 70,000:1.

Yeolight developed new amber OLED lighting and automotive OLED rearlights

Yeolight Technology (which was spun-off Visionox in May 2015) developed a new bright Amber OLED panel. The panel's size is 85x85 mm (active area 76.5x76.5 mm) and its color temperature is 2000K-2600K. The efficiency is >70 lm/W at 2,000 cd/m2 brightness. The lifetime is over 20,000 hours.

Yeolight brite amber OLED prototype photo

This new panel is still a prototype - but Yeolight says it can already be mass produced at the company's 2.5-Gen production line.