OLED patents

Apple asks Samsung to lower its OLED iPhone shipments by 15% in 2022, and Samsung is not pleased

An interesting report from Korea suggests that Apple's CEO met with Samsung Display's CEO recently, as Apple is looking to reduce its OLED iPhone orders from Samsung by around 15% in 2022.

Apple iPhone 13 photo

Apple, like the rest of the technology industry, is facing supply constraints and has already said that it won't be able to meet the demand for its products in 2022. Apple's original plan was to produce 220 million iPhones in 2022, and it expected to order 160 million iPhone AMOLED panels from SDC. Apple's now expects to ship only 185 million iPhones.

LORDIN hopes to launch a commercial blue OLED emitter by 2024, plans to go public later in 2022

The Elec reports that Korea-based LORDIN is progressing with its blue OLED emitter technology. The company recently filed for a high-efficiency blue OLED emission patent, and according to the company's plans it aims to have a commercial blue OLED emitter out in 2024.

Not much is known about LORDIN's technology, beyond a statement by LORDIN that says it aims to achieve over 90% IQE, and that it is based on the control of energy transfer speed between emitter molecules. the energy transfer speed between molecules inside the material to increase efficiency.

On SEL's ExTET OLED device architecture

In 2016, Researchers from Japan's Semiconductor Energy Laboratory (SEL) announced a new OLED device architecture, called ExTET ('exciplex–triplet energy transfer'), that can increase the performance of OLED devices. The technology was applied for a patent in 2011.

Conventional Vs. EXTeT OLED mechanisms (SEL)

The ExTET technology, which is a modification of the host material and the EML layer in phosphorescent OLED devices, have since been introduced to commercial AMOLED panels, increasing the efficiency and lifetime of the materials, while also lowering the drive voltage.

LG Display renews its patent license agreement with SEL

LG Display announced that it renewed its patent license agreement with Japan's Semiconductor Energy Laboratory (SEL). It is not clear from the release, but it seems as if LGD has access to SEL's entire display patent portfolio.

SEL 8.3-inch 8K OLED prototype (Dec 2018)

SEL, established in 1980, engages with research and development across many fields, and is very active with OLED technology research. In recent years, SEL developed flexible and foldable OLED technologies, OLED device structures, novel OLED materials, OLED CAAC-IGZO backplanes, and more.

A new transparent electrode design improves OLED light output by up to 20%

Researchers from the University of Michigan developed a new electrode design for OLED devices, that can increase light output by up to 20% compared to current electrodes. The new electrode is compatible with current production processes.

OLED device with waveguide-elimination structure (University of Michigan)

The new design helps to minimize the waveguiding effect, which traps around 80% of the light produced by the OLED emitters. The researchers used a modal elimination approach, which involves optimizing the organic stack and the replacing the ITO anode with a thin film of silver deposited on a layer of copper. This kind of approach can be applied to other light emitting structures such as inorganic LEDs, perovskite LEDs, quantum dots and more.

Samsung wins an USPTO challenge against one of Solas' OLED patents

Earlier this month we reported that the US district court in Texas decreed that Samsung Display and Samsung Electronics are to pay $62.7 million in damages as the companies wilfully infringed upon two of Solas OLED fundamental OLED patents (USPTO #7,446,338 and #9,256,311).

Samsung proceeded to file a patent office challenge against the #311 patent, and apparantly Samsung won the challenge. The patent describes a flexible touch sensor that is wrapped around the edge of the display - and Samsung argued that as a flexible touch sensor is already known, this patent is "obvious". It appears as if Samsung will not have to pay the $35.4 million in damages for this patent.

The US court in Texas says Samsung should pay $62.7 million to Solas due to two OLED patents it infringed upon

Ireland-based OLED IP company Solas OLED announced that a jury in the US district court in Texas has found Samsung Display and Samsung Electronics liable to Solas for wilfully infringing two fundamental OLED patents (USPTO #7,446,338 and #9,256,311). The jury awarded solas with $62.7 million in damages.

Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra photo

Solas says that these patents are required for AMOLED to function - these patents were used in the OLED displays used in Samsung's Galaxy S and Galaxy Note smartphones.

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