OLED Lifetime: introduction and market status

OLED displays use organic materials that emit light when electricity is applied. OLEDs enable emissive, bright, thin, flexible and efficient displays. OLEDs are set to replace LCDs in all display applications - from small displays to large TV sets.

UDC OLED material performance, 2012

One of the main problems of OLED displays is the limited lifetime of the OLED materials. In past years we have seen great advances in this area, and today OLED materials are quite long lasting - with material lifetime reaching million hours or more.

Blue OLED lifetime

A blue OLED emitter is the most unstable emitter, and blue OLEDs (required to create a full-color display) suffer from short lifetimes. This is especially true for the efficient phosphorescent blue emitter - and today there's still no commercial efficient blue emitter.

Bright blue PHOLED (University of Michigan)

The OLED industry is seeking several routes to develop an efficient blue. PHOLED pioneer Universal Display is developing a blue PHOLED, but has yet to find a commercial-ready material. Other promising route is TADF emitter technology.

Next-generation OLED technologies that will enable brighter and more efficient displays

OLED displays have been gaining popularity rapidly, and are already the dominant smartphone display technology. OLEDs are also the display technology of choice in the smartwatch market, making inroads into the TV, monitor, laptop and tablet markets. The future of the OLED industry looks bright.

In recent years, the focus of the industry, beyond increasing capacity and reducing production costs, has been improving the performance of OLEDs in the areas of display brightness, efficiency, and lifetime. Brightness is required in many applications - from TVs (for HDR and to view in ambient lighting) through smartphones (outdoor viewing) to automotive, and efficiency is a plus in any scenario (but mostly in mobile displays). Display lifetime is already good enough for many applications, but in some cases (like automotive, and IT displays) it is critical. These three properties usually go together - if you can make more efficient OLED displays, you can drive them at a lower current to achieve the same brightness, and so lifetime increases, or you can achieve higher brightness, etc. 

Read the full story Posted: Jul 10,2024

ETNews: Samsung Display to supply its latest M14 AMOLED panels to Apple and Google

ETNews reports that Samsung Display has developed a new OLED stack, the M14 stack, that it will sell to both Apple and Google to be used in their latest smartphones. The new stack improve the efficiency, lifetime and brightness of the display compared to SDC's previous generation stack. 

According to ETNews, the new M14 stack will be used int he upcoming iPhone 16 Pro and Pro Max. Apple's regular iPhone 16 models will use the previous AMOLED stack, Samsung's M12. Google will also adopt the M14 stack in its Pixel 9 (all 3 model types) and the upcoming Pixel Fold 2.

Read the full story Posted: Jul 03,2024

LG Display starts mass producing 13-inch tandem laptop OLED panels

LG Display says that it has started to mass produce tandem OLED laptop panels, the first company to do so. LGD says its tandem architecture double the lifetime of its OLEDs, reduce power consumption by up to 40%, and enable up to three times the brightness.

LGD has been producing tandem OLED displays since 2019, mainly for the automotive industry. This expertise has enabled it to be Apple's main tandem OLED display suppler for its 2024 iPad Pro devices, and now to be the first one to produce tandem laptop panels. 

Read the full story Posted: Jun 24,2024

Researchers develop the longest lasting deep-blue CMA TADF OLED emitters

Researchers from the University of Manchester, University of Cambridge and University of Eastern Finland, led by Dr. Alexander Romanov have developed a new deep-blue Carbene-Metal-Amide (CMA) OLED emitter material with promising operating lifetime.

The emitter is based on a a new CMA complex with a rigid amide donor, benzoguanidine. The researcher say that the new design unlocks bright charge-transfer deep-blue emission with 100% photoluminescence quantum yields. The excited state lifetimes of the new CMA complexes are among the lowest reported to date among all TADF emitters
(down to 213 ns), resulting in remarkably fast radiative rates of up to 4.7 × 10 6 s−1

Read the full story Posted: Jun 03,2024

The Elec: UDC's blue PHOLED material is still unstable, may delay market introduction

Universal Display Corporation has announced several times that it is progressing with its blue PHOLED material development, and it is on track to release the first commercial material by the end of 2024. In November 2023 we reported that UBI estimates that Samsung has delayed the adoption of a blue PHOLED to the second half of 2025.

UDC RGB PHOLED materials photoNow there's a new report in Korea that claims that UDC's blue PHOLED project is facing technical challenges, and UDC is still not able to achieve a long-lasting blue emitter at the right color point. It will be interesting to know whether UDC addresses this issue in its next investor conference call (May 2nd). 

Read the full story Posted: Apr 16,2024

Samsung researchers collaborate with the UK's NPL to better understand blue OLED degradation mechanisms

Researchers from the UK's National Physical Laboratory (NPL), together with the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT), released a new study to better understand the degradation of blue OLED devices. 

Close-up of the OrbiSIMS instrument’s vacuum chamber showing the nozzles of the ion beams and electrode that extract ionised molecules for analysis (Picture credit: NPL)

The OLED degradation mechanisms that limit the lifetime of blue OLED emitters, whether physical, chemical or something else, are still not yet fully understood. Understanding the degradation mechanism of blue OLEDs is essential to improve their performance and stability. The NPL / SAIT team used OrbiSIMS, an innovative mass spectrometry imaging technique invented at NPL in 2017, to study OLED degradation. 

Read the full story Posted: Feb 15,2024

Toray Research Center shows how OLED inspection and analysis enable the production of higher performance OLED panels

Toray Research Center (TRC) has launched a new open online webinar focused on OLED inspection and analysis technologies. TRC, who supplies technical analysis and support for R&D and manufacturing, invites you to attend the online lectures at no cost, to get a deeper understanding on OLED inspection and analysis, and how to achieve higher performance displays. The webinar recordings are accessible until February 15.

Toray Research Center TRC banner

The webinar include four presentations:

  • Identification of Trace Impurities Using High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry (Toward High-Quality OLED Panels)
  • Analysis of Small Molecule OLED Layers in Solution Process and Vacuum Deposition Process
  • Moisture Diffusion Evaluation in Encapsulant
  • Analysis of QD sheet (Quantum Dot Enhancement Film)

The first presentation, titled Identification of Trace Impurities Using High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry (Toward High-Quality OLED Panels), details examples of possible degradation in OLED devices that lead to performance reduction. In this presentation, TRC discusses the role of analysis, the advantages of high mass resolution, different evaluation techniques and how it can help developers increase the performance of OLED displays.

Read the full story Posted: Feb 06,2024

Single-layer TADF OLEDs outperform the best multi-layer device in both efficiency and lifetime

In 2023, we reported on research conducted at Germany's Max Planck Institute, led by Prof. Paul W.M. Blom, that looks into single-layer OLED devices. In such devices, a single TADF OLED emitter layer is sandwiched between two electrode - a much simpler design compared to commercial OLED devices that use multilayer stacks, sometimes with 10 or more layers. The researchers the the MPI say that in fact it is possible to develop highly efficient OLEDs with just the TADF emitter - and have demonstrated 100% IQE single-layer devices, with an EQE of 27.7%

Prof. Blom's group continues to improve its single-layer TADF OLED device, and have now reported that by employing a recently developed trap-free large band gap material as a host for the DMAC-BP OLED emitter, a nearly balanced charge transport is achieved. The device achieves a record power efficiency for DMAC-BP TADF OLEDs of 82 lm/W - surpassing  the best reported multilayer power efficiencies of 52.9–59 lm/W. This is due to the lower operating voltage. The single-layer device reaches an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 19.6%, which is only slightly lower than the reported EQEs of 18.9–21% for multilayer devices. In addition to the high power efficiency, the operational stability is greatly improved compared to multilayer devices and the use of conventional host materials in combination with DMAC-BP as an emitter.

Read the full story Posted: Feb 02,2024

Researchers use intermittent vacuum deposition to increase OLED device performance

Researchers from Japan's Chiba University developed a new method to deposit thin OLED layers that achieves controllable molecular arrangement - that can be used to increase the efficiency and lifetime of OLED devices.

The method, called intermittent deposition, uses pauses in deposition and changes in deposition conditions to invert the orientation of the organic molecules, thus achieving high control over the resulting films. The researchers built on a tool called Rotary Kelvin Probe (RKP) that is used to measure the surface potential during and after the deposition in real-time. The new approach of intermittent deposition created a relaxed and stable surface layer with controllable polarization. 

Read the full story Posted: Jan 18,2024