Article last updated on: Feb 08, 2019

OLED displays use organic materials that emit light when electricity is applied. OLEDs enable emissive, bright, thin, flexible and efficient displays. OLEDs are set to replace LCDs in all display applications - from small displays to large TV sets.

UDC OLED material performance, 2012

One of the main problems of OLED displays is the limited lifetime of the OLED materials. In past years we have seen great advances in this area, and today OLED materials are quite long lasting - with material lifetime reaching million hours or more.

Blue OLED lifetime

A blue OLED emitter is the most unstable emitter, and blue OLEDs (required to create a full-color display) suffer from short lifetimes. This is especially true for the efficient phosphorescent blue emitter - and today there's still no commercial efficient blue emitter.

Bright blue PHOLED (University of Michigan)



The OLED industry is seeking several routes to develop an efficient blue. PHOLED pioneer Universal Display is developing a blue PHOLED, but has yet to find a commercial-ready material. Other promising route is TADF emitter technology.

The latest OLED lifetime news:

Ergis launches a new OLED encapsulation film platform

Poland-based Ergis Group has developed a new solution for OLED panel encapsulation. The noDiffusion film, developed in collaboration with Ergis' partners can be adopted as both the flexible substrate and the encapsulation layer for OLED devices.

Ergis noDiffusion structure

The Ergis noDiffusion film offers high barrier properties, high level of optical transmittance and a low level of light scattering. This enables the production of OLED displays with extended lifetimes, efficiency and image properties. The noDiffusion film can also be used in the production of solar panels to increase panel efficiency and lifetimes.

Ergis says that the biggest advantage of its new film solution is the lower manufacturing costs, as the films already include an embedded encapsulation layer and could optionally include an embedded electrode layer.

Kyulux updates on its latest Hyperfluorescence TADF emitter performance

Kyulux presented a new paper at SID Displayweek, that shows the latest progress of the company's Hyperfluorescence OLED emitter platform. You can see the latest performance chart below.

Kyulux TADF HF material specifications, August 2020

Hyperfluorescence combines TADF and fluorescence emitters, which enables high-efficiency (~100% IQE) emitters that feature long lifetimes and a very narrow emission spectrum. The company's yellow HF emitter is already commercialized, and now Kyulux says that its red and green materials are "close to commercialization". The company is also improving the color point and lifetime of its HF blue emitters.

OLEDWorks to introduce a new high-performance multi-stack OLED microdisplay technology

OLED lighting developer OLEDWorks announced that it has developed a high-performance multi-stack OLED microdisplay technology. Next week at SID Displayweek OLEDWorks will present the technology, and results from 3, 4 and 5-stack microdisplay formulations.

OLEDWorks explains that it has realized its multi-stack OLED lighting technology - and the results are "exceptional". The company says that combined wit its unique and cost-effective manufacturing technology, microdisplays based on this new technology could combine high brightness, long lifetimes, exceptional power efficiencies - all at a low manufacturing cost.

Kopin developed a double-stack OLED architecture for higher brightness OLED microdisplays

Kopin Corporation announced that the company developed a new double-stack OLED architecture that enables brighter microdisplays with longer lifetime.

Kopin Lightning OLED microdisplay photo

Kopin 1" 2k x 2k OLED Lightning microdisplay

Last week Kopin announced a new 1.3" 2560x2560 OLED microdisplay, and the company now reveals that this display uses the new double-stack architecture and achieves brightness of over 1,000 nits. Kopin also says that this display was co-developed with Panasonic and Lakeside Optoelectronic.

TADF OLED emitter technology - industry status

TADF, or Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence, is a relatively new class of OLED emitter materials that promise efficient and long-lifetime performance without any heavy metals. TADF research started at around 2012, originally at Kyushu University in Japan and today many academic groups and several commercial companies are developing TADF materials.

Blue TADF emitter molecules

The main reason companies are interested in TADF emission is that it could lead to an efficient and long-lasting blue OLED emitter - something that hasn't been yet achieved by other means (mainly - UDC's Phosphorescent OLED emitter technology). In recent years companies initiated commercial development of red, green and yellow TADF emitters as these can offer a lower cost alternative to UDC's PHOLEDs materials.

Idemitsu Kosan and Toray developed a red TADF/HF device that is the world's most efficient OLED emitter

Idemitsu Kosan and Toray Industries announced that the companies have jointly developed a red OLED device that is the world's most efficient emitter at 46 cd/A. The device uses a TADF emitter combined with red fluorescent materials (which likely means this is a HyperFluorescence device).

Idemitsu and Toray has been collaborating on OLED material development since 2017. This new device uses Idemitsu's TADF material combined with Toray's new red fluorescent material. The two companies say that this new material provides the same results as currently used red phosphorescent devices, and the plan is now to "drive forward to secure adoption of their materials" in mobile and TV applications.

Samsung researchers improve the efficiency and lifetime of self-emissive cadmium-free quantum dots

Researchers from Samsung's Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT) developed a new method to increase the efficiency and lifetime of self-emissive Cadmium-free quantum dots. The researchers used Indium Phosphide QDs in a new structure that prevents oxidation and energy leaks and also absorbs current faster.

The researchers say that the new structure enhancements increases the internal quantum efficiency to almost 100 (the EQE reached 21.4%) while increasing the lifetime to a million hours (at a high brightness of 100 cd/m2). The maximum brightness is 100,000 nits. This performance is comparable to Cadmium-based QDs.

Early-stage startup Noctiluca to commercialize new TADF OLED compounds

A new company has recently been launched in Poland, to commercialize a new family of TADF OLED compounds. Noctiluca, which takes its name from a bio-luminescent marine creature, was established a few months ago with aims to be the world's first company to produce a commercial-ready blue TADF emitter.

Noctiluca Synthex materials photo

Noctiluca's story begins with an innovative organic DSSC solar cell platform that was developed at Synthex, an organic chemistry development platform company based in Toruń, Poland. A few years ago the researchers turned their attention to light emitting materials (which are quite similar to the light harvesting materials used in solar panels) and intensive research culminated in a promising family of new TADF compounds - which was then spun-off as Noctiluca,

Universal Display reports excellent quarterly results and increases its guidance for 2019

Universal Display reported its financial results for Q2 2019. Revenues were $118.2 million, the operating profit reached $48.7 million and net income was $43.4 million. UDC increased its 2019 revenue guidance to be in the range of $370 million to $390 million. The company ended Q2 with $553 million in cash and equivalents.

UDC PHOLED materials photo (2017)
The Q2 results include about $15-20 million of orders that UDC estimates were pulled-in from the second half of 2019 as Chinese customers build up inventory for trade-related reasons.

Researchers develop a single-layer, efficient TADF OLED device

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) have developed an efficient OLED device that is comprised of a single organic material layer - replacing the normal stack of 5-7 layers in modern OLED devices.

Single-layer TADF OLED device (MPI)

The researchers managed to create this OLED device by using a TADF material (CzDBA, diboron based TADF) and by using a newly developed charge injection strategy. The OLED device features a low operating voltage (2.9V at 10,000 cd/m2, an EQE of 19% (at 500 cd/m2) and a lifetime of 1,880 hours at 50% (for 1,000 cd/m2). The color of the device is greenish-yellow.