Reports from Korea suggest that Samsung still faces technology challenges before it can begin producing QD-OLED TVs

Samsung is developing its QD-OLED TV technology and the company was supposed to hold an investment review committee on April 2019 to decide whether to go ahead with plans to start production soon (mass production by the end of 2020).

QD-OLED stack scheme (DSCC, Oct-2018)

However in May we later reported that Samsung decided to delay the production - trial production will begin towards the end of 2020, with real mass production on a new 10-Gen line only at around 2023. A new report from Korea sheds some more light on Samsung's situation.

DSCC: OLED equipment spending will rebound in 2020

DSCC estimates that the mobile OLED equipment will rebound in 2020 - up 461% in fact to $8.2 billion, after falling 88% in 2019.

LCD and OLED equipment spending (2016-2020, DSCC)
In 2020, OLED spending will account for 56% of the total display equipment market spending, basically returning to the levels we saw in 2017-2018.

UBI: OLED production capacity to double by 2023, Korean makers to retain their 80% market share by area

UBI Research estimates that OLED production capacity will increase from 34.9 million sqm to 68.5 million by 2023. LG Display and Samsung Display are expected to increase production of OLED TV and introduce new 10.5-Gen fabs better suited for 65" TV production.

OLED production capacity by country (2019-2023, UBI)

Mobile OLED production capacity will also grow, but at a slower rate - from 13 million sqm in 2019 to 19.3 million sqm in 2023, mainly driven by Chinese OLED producers that produce flexible smartphone OLED displays mainly for the Chinese domestic market. Korean OLED producers (SDC and LGD) will continue to dominate the market and will retain their ~80% market share in 2023.

Electron spin control enables triplet-only excition formation in OLEDs

Researchers from RIKEN, the University of California, San Diego and others have developed a new mechanism to enhance the efficiency of OLED devices. The basic idea is to manipulate the electron spin to control the OLED exciton formation - basically lowering the OLED voltage so that only triplets and formed instead of a combination of singlets and triplets.

PTCDA OLED spin research image (RIKEN)

The researchers demonstrated this principal using an organic molecule called 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA), placed on a metal-supported, ultrathin insulating film. By measuring the emission spectrum, they could monitor the exciton type - and show that at a low voltage, only triplets are formed.

The 4th International TADF Workshop 2019The 4th International TADF Workshop 2019