OLED displays used to redefine ultrasound medical technology

Researchers from North Carolina State University developed a new technique that could drastically lower the cost of ultrasound acoustic imaging, using OLED displays. The researchers say that ultrasound receivers could be made with costs of around $100 - compared to current systems which cost $100,000 or more.

The researchers fabricated an OLED on top of a piezoelectric transducer. When ultrasonic waves interact with the transducer, it lights up the OLED display. This create a very simple ultrasound device compared to current devices.

Samsung Display developed a 18.2" 350 nits ink-jet printed OLED panel

Samsung Display has developed a 18.2" 2560x1440 202 PPI inkjet-printed OLED display, that features the highest current efficiency of any inkjet-printed OLED, with the brightness at 350 cd/m2 (full white).

Samsung Display 18.2'' ink-jet printed OLED (SID DW 2020)

Samsung Display says that the high brightness was achieved by tuning the top-emission device structure with high performance soluble materials. The high pixel resolution was achieved by modulating the jetting waveform for ejecting ink drops and improving the drop placement accuracy by selecting the right ink formulations in terms of viscosities and surface energies.

Kyulux updates on its latest Hyperfluorescence TADF emitter performance

Kyulux presented a new paper at SID Displayweek, that shows the latest progress of the company's Hyperfluorescence OLED emitter platform. You can see the latest performance chart below.

Kyulux TADF HF material specifications, August 2020

Hyperfluorescence combines TADF and fluorescence emitters, which enables high-efficiency (~100% IQE) emitters that feature long lifetimes and a very narrow emission spectrum. The company's yellow HF emitter is already commercialized, and now Kyulux says that its red and green materials are "close to commercialization". The company is also improving the color point and lifetime of its HF blue emitters.

OLEDWorks to introduce a new high-performance multi-stack OLED microdisplay technology

OLED lighting developer OLEDWorks announced that it has developed a high-performance multi-stack OLED microdisplay technology. Next week at SID Displayweek OLEDWorks will present the technology, and results from 3, 4 and 5-stack microdisplay formulations.

OLEDWorks explains that it has realized its multi-stack OLED lighting technology - and the results are "exceptional". The company says that combined wit its unique and cost-effective manufacturing technology, microdisplays based on this new technology could combine high brightness, long lifetimes, exceptional power efficiencies - all at a low manufacturing cost.

An interesting Microsoft research project looks at under-the-OLED cameras

OLED producers are looking at under-the-OLED cameras - this is a great technology that could enable complete bezel-less smartphone displays without any pop-up selfie cameras. Samsung, in 2018, announced it is working on several behind-the-OLED sensors, including a camera. But China's Visionox is the first company that actually launched such a technology commercially.

Microsoft research - behind the OLED cameras photo

Microsoft recently published an interesting research project (led by Sehoon Lim) that discusses the potential use cases of under-the-OLED camera and its advantages, and also the challenges - with AI technologies that could assist in solving these issues.

Korean researchers develop a highly-efficient deep-blue phosphorescent OLED emitter

Researchers from Korea's Pusan National University have developed an efficient deep-blue phosphorescent OLED emitter. The researcher say that their new materials has an EQE of 24% while the color point is CIE (0.149, 0.085).

According to the Korean press, the main achievement in this research was the adjustment of the doping concentration of a novel dopant (mer ‐Ir1) to optimize the balance of electron and holes in the light emitting layer.

Researchers fabricate an efficient flexible OLED that uses Mxene electrodes

Researchers from Seoul National University developed a flexible green OLED device that uses 2D titanium carbide MXene as a flexible and transparent electrode. The display achieved an efficiency of 100 cd/A, comparable to ITO-based devices, while showing good bending stability.

The researchers say that the MXene electrodes are much more flexible than ITO electrodes and this material could hold the key towards highly flexible transparent conductive display electrodes.

KAIST researchers developed a stress-relief substrate for stretchable OLED displays

Korea's KAIST institute researchers developed a new stress-relief substrate that is suitable for the creation of stretchable OLEDs that can maintain their performance under high-strain deformation.

Stress-relief substrate for stretchable OLEDs (KAIST)

The researchers say that the new stress-relief substrates have a unique structure and is made from a patterned "upper substrate" with bridges on top of pillars that decentralize the stress on the device.

SimBeyond and SCM to develop a fully integrated multi-scale OLED simulation tool

SimBeyond and Software for Chemistry & Materials (SCM) announced a collaboration to develop novel OLED simulation software, with support from the Dutch agency of enterprises.

Simbeyond/SCM OLED integrated multi-scale OLED simulation image

SCM and SimBeyond will develop the first fully integrated multi-scale simulation pipeline for OLEDs that will provide material researchers with an easy-to-use solution that will help predict the performance of any combination of materials and stack architectures, under a wide range of operational conditions.

Cambridge Isotope Laboratories - Deutreated Reagents and High-Purity Gases for OLEDsCambridge Isotope Laboratories - Deutreated Reagents and High-Purity Gases for OLEDs