Kyulux: our green Hyperfluoresence emitter is getting close to commercialization

Hyperfluoresence emitter system developer Kyulux announced that its green material is getting close to commercialization. The company is now working closely with OLED makers, preparing for early adoption.

Kyulux OLEDs World Summit 2021 slide image

Kyulux says that its green emitter has not only met the required performance of OLED panel makers, in terms of efficiency, lifetime and driving voltage - but has actually surpassed the performance of green phosphorescent emitters in top emission devices. The green HF device achieves higher current efficiency, longer lifetime and offers a narrow emission spectrum and can thus enable better chromaticity.

Kyulux reveals its latest TADF material performance

During SID Display Week 2021, Kyulux detailed its latest TADF material performance. The red and green materials are "close to commercialization", and the company reports "excellent progress" with its blue emitter.

Using simulations, Kyulux shows how its Hyperfluorescence system is more efficient than a comparable phosphorescence emitter. While both emitters feature pretty much the same EQE, the narrow spectrum of the HF system which results in higher light intensity and can enable more efficient displays - by around 10%, according to Kyulux.

The price of Iridium is at an all-time high, will that effect the price of OLED materials and displays?

Phosphorescent materials are based on the addition of a heavy-metal to the emissive materails, and most (if not all?) commercial materials use Iridium. The price of this rare metal has hit an all-time high last week.

Iridium Ore photo

Towards the end of last year, the price of one oz of Iridium was $1,760. Last week it hit $6,000 - the price jumped over 300% in just three months. Experts explain that the price has risen due to a disruption in the supply in South Africa (which supplies around 80% of the global market) and strong demand from the electrical and electrochemical sector.

UDC and PPG to establish a new PHOLED production site in Ireland

PPG Industries and Universal Display established a strategic relationship in 2000, and since then PPG is the exclusive producer of UDC's PHOLED emitter materials. The two companies announced that they will establish a new manufacturing site in Shannon, Ireland, for the production of UDC's emitters.

UDC RGB PHOLED materials photo

The new facility will double the production capacity of UDC's OLED emitters at PPG, and will also diversify the company's manufacturing base. UDC leased the Ireland site (which, up until now, was producing pharmaceutical intermediates) and will adapt it to PHOLED production. Facility improvements and regulatory approvals are expected to be completed in the next 12 months, and operations are scheduled to commence in early 2022.

Is UDC getting ready to commercialize its plasmon OLED technology?

A couple of months ago we reported that researchers at UDC developed an OLED device with plasmonic decay rate enhancement that dramatically increase device stability. It turns out that UDC filed for two new trademark applications that seem to hint it is aiming to commercialize this technology.

UDC PLASMONLED trademark image

The two trademarks at PLASMON PHOLED and PLASMONLED, which both of course indicate that these are emitters that adopt plasmon technology.

Universal Display reports its financial results for Q3 2020

Universal Display reported its Q3 2020 financial results, with revenues of $117 million (up from $58 million in Q2 2020 and $98 million in Q3 2019, and a net income of $40.5 million. UDC ended the quarter with with $673 million in cash and equivalents

UDC reports a significant pickup in customer orders in the third quarter, and the company expects full-year 2020 revenues to be in the range of $385 million to $400 million. UDC sees meaningful growth in the OLED industry in 2021 and beyond.

UDC researchers developed a stable plasmonic-enhanced OLED device

Researchers at Universal Display, developed an OLED device with plasmonic decay rate enhancement that dramatically increase device stability. By including a nanoparticle-based out-coupling scheme to extract energy from the plasmon mode, the researchers managed to maintain the device efficiency.

Stable plasmonic OLED structure and image, UDC

The device used an archetypal phosphorescent emitter to achieve a two-fold increase in functional stability at the same brightness as a reference conventional OLED device and extracted 16% of the energy from the plasmon mode as light.