Merck - printed red, green and blue OLED efficiencies are now comparable to vapor-processed ones

Apr 21, 2017

Merck is going to discuss its latest soluble OLED material performance at SID DisplayWeek 2017 next month. Merck will detail the printed device efficiencies, voltages, and colors.

According to Merck, the efficiencies of its soluble OLED emitters are now comparable to state-of-the-art vapor-processed devices. Merck will also suggest a move from an evaporated blue common layer device architecture to a printed blue.

The EU launches a €4 million project to develop efficient hyperfluorescence TADF OLED emitters

Apr 21, 2017

The EU launched a new project called HyperOLED with an aim to develop materials and matching device architectures for high-performance, hyperfluorescence TADF OLED emitters. HyperOLED is coordinated by Merck, and the project partners include MicroOLED and the Fraunhofer IOF institute. This three years project received a €4 million grant from the EU.

HyperOLED logo

These OLED emitters will be realized by combining TADF molecular hosts with novel shielded fluorescence emitters, targeting saturated blue emission of very high efficiency at high brightness. The project will also achieve efficiency gains through molecular alignment to enhance light outcoupling.

OLED for VR and AR Market Report

Cynora's CMO: we're on track to commercialize blue TADF emitters by the end of 2017

Apr 10, 2017

Dr. Andreas Haldi was appointed as CYNORA's Chief Marketing Office in 2016. CYNORA develops efficient blue TADF OLED emitters, and Dr. Haldi was kind enough to participate in this interview and help us understand CYNORA's business and technology.

Cynora Blue TADF OLED material photo

Q: Thank you Andreas for helping us understand CYNORA's business and technology better. CYNORA has set up on a focused mission to develop a commercial blue TADF emitter. What will you consider to be a market-ready material, in terms of lifetime, efficiency and color point?

For the last 5 years, CYNORA has worked on developing thermally activated delayed fluorescent (TADF) OLED emitters. End of 2015 we started to focus on efficient blue materials, which are still a key issue for OLED displays. Compared to the red and green pixels, the blue pixel is much less efficient. An increased efficiency of the blue pixel would therefore significantly reduce the power consumption of the display.

Samsung reportedly demonstrated new OLED technologies - including polarizer-free OLEDs and 1,200 PPI VR displays

Mar 23, 2017

According to the Korea Herald, Samsung Electronics demonstrated several new display technologies in a private room during the Mobile World Congress last month. All of these technologies are expected to enter production within the next year or two, according to the source quoted by the report.

1,200 PPI AMOLED for VR

The report claims that Samsung demonstrated a high-resolution AMOLED panel for VR applications. The AMOLED on display featured a 1,200 PPI - much higher than Samsung's current highest density displays which are 577 PPI. Samsung's aim is to reach 1,500 PPI which will greatly enhance the VR experience.

SDC 806 PPI VR OLED at SID 2016

In November 2016 Sunic Systems announced that it developed an plane-source evaporation-FMM based AMOLED production process that can reach very high densities. The 100um mask announced in November can achieve a PPI of 1,500. This may be the system that Samsung is now testing. Sunic says that eventually this technology will enable even 2,250 PPI.

CYNORA’s TADF emitters ready for industrial test within one year

Dec 20, 2016

In 2016, TADF (Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence) emitters have received much attention in the OLED industry as the most promising method to improve OLED displays. CYNORA is one of the most active companies with several years of experience in this field and the company is now getting ready to bring a first blue TADF material to the OLED market.

Cynora researchers photo

In a little more than one year, CYNORA has set itself up to become a major OLED material supplier. First, an experienced CEO in this field, Gildas Sorin, the former CEO of Novaled GmbH, was brought in. Since then, CYNORA has shown significant improvement in material performance starting with the announcement of two milestones.

Is TADF the future of efficient OLED emitters?

Nov 02, 2016
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TADF, or Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence, represents a class of OLED emitter materials that aim to provide efficient and long-lifetime performance. TADF research started in earnest in 2012, and some believe that TADF represent an exciting new platform for next-gen OLED emitters.

Blue TADF emitter molecules

As OLED display adoption grows, researchers and developers at Universities and companies are looking to develop more efficient and cost-effective OLED materials. There are currently three main drivers for these efforts - the development of an efficient and long-lasting blue color emitter, the development of alternative non-phosphorescent emitters and the development of soluble materials that can be deposited in ink-jet printing and other "wet" methods.

Cynora latest TADF blue emitters feature higher efficiency and lifetime

Oct 05, 2016

Germany-based blue-TADF OLED emitter developer Cynora announced that it developed a new blue-emitting material that combines high efficiency with long lifetime. Cynora's new material offers an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 14% and a lifetime of 420 hours (LT80, at 500 cd/m2).

Cynora blue TADF emitter photo

In May 2016 Cynora announced two blue emitter systems - with one featuring a high efficiency and the other a long lifetime. This time Cynora managed to create a single system with both efficiency and lifetime. The company says that they are optimistic that they will reach a commercial TADF blue emitter by the end of 2017.

Will SEL's ExTEF device architecture finally enable an efficient blue OLED?

Aug 26, 2016

Researchers from Japan's Semiconductor Energy Laboratory (SEL) developed a new OLED device architecture that enables efficient, long-lasting and low-drive voltage OLEDs, at practical brightness levels.

ExTET process and energy states diagram

The researchers call the new device architecture exciplex-triplet energy transfer, or ExTEF. The image above shows the elementary process and its energy state diagram. To create the emissive layer of the ExTEF, the researcher took a film with an electron-transporting material (ETM) and a hole-transporting material (HTM) and doped it with a phosphorescent dopant. Direct recombination between the electrons at the LUMO level and the hole at the HUMO level forms a charge-transfer excited complex (exciplex) - and the phosphorescent emission occurs via energy transfer from the exciplex to the dopant.

Researchers develop a new tool to quickly identify new OLED molecules

Aug 09, 2016

Researchers from Harvard University, MIT and Samsung developed a large-scale computer-driven material screening process that incorporates theoretical and experimental chemistry, machine learning and cheminformatics, with an aim to quickly identify new OLED molecules.

The so-called Molecular Space Shuttle system was used to design more than 1,000 new high-performance blue-light emitting molecules. It seems that there is still a lot of work ahead to find the best new candidates and actually test these molecules, but this may be a promising new direction in OLED molecule research.

Kyulux: advancing fast to commercialize yellow, green and blue TADF emitters

Jun 28, 2016

Kyulux logoIn early 2016, Kyushu University in Japan spun-off a new start-up called Kyulux to commercialize the TADF emitters developed at the University. A few months later, Kyulux raised $13.5 million (from LG, Samsung, Japan Display and JOLED).

We have met with Kyulux's team at SID 2016, who updated us that the company is progressing fast on the way to commercialize those TADF emitters. The first products to be ready are green and yellow emitters. Kyulux says that its Hyper-fluorescence TADF emitters offer a superior performance compared to PHOLED emitters (in both intensity and color purity) - and they should also be priced lower - so the company aims to provide a viable alternative to UDC's emitters in the near future.