Samsung LogoSamsung Electronics Co. Ltd. was showing three prototype OLED TVs based on 14-inch panels. That's larger than the 11-inch screens that are in the new Sony TVs but a close look at the Samsung panels revealed some imperfections. In each of the three prototypes on display were pixels locked to a single color.

Japan's Seiko Epson Corp., which has been researching OLED technology for many years, was displaying five prototype 8-inch OLED panels. In contrast to the Samsung panels, the Epson ones didn't have any visible defects and offered a bright, smooth and crisp image. The screens, which are 3 millimeters thick, attracted a crowd at the show -- many more people than the company expected, a representative confided.

Neither Samsung nor Epson would say when their larger TV screens might be ready for mass production.

Samsung SDI Co. Ltd. was showing a bendable 4-inch OLED. The screen was fixed in a slightly curved position and delivered a good picture but again there were imperfections visible. The company was also showing what must be one of the thinnest OLED panels in the world. At just 0.37 millimeters the 2.4-inch QVGA panel is super thin and destined for use in cell phones.

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